Albert Einstein


Physicist


University of Zurich


Rämistrasse 71
CH-8006 Zürich, Switzerland


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Albert Einstein


Physicist


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Albert Einstein


Physicist


University of Zurich


Rämistrasse 71
CH-8006 Zürich, Switzerland


Google Scholar
Wikipedia
Facebook
Twitter


Brownian motion


Brownian motion or pedesis is the random motion of particles suspended in a fluid (a liquid or a gas) resulting from their collision with the quick atoms or molecules in the gas or liquid. This transport phenomenon is named after the botanist Robert Brown. In 1827, while looking through a microscope at particles trapped in cavities inside pollen grains in water, he noted that the particles moved through the water but was not able to determine the mechanisms that caused this motion. Atoms and molecules had long been theorized as the constituents of matter, and many decades later, Albert Einstein published a paper in 1905 that explained in precise detail how the motion that Brown had observed was a result of the pollen being moved by individual water molecules. This explanation of Brownian motion served as definitive confirmation that atoms and molecules actually exist, and was further verified experimentally by Jean Perrin in 1908. The direction of the force of atomic bombardment is constantly changing, and at different times the particle is hit more on one side than another, leading to the seemingly random nature of the motion. [Wikipedia](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brownian_motion)

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